Canteen Manager Training Part 1

The NHSC Food categorisation system

Page last updated: 08 October 2013

The focus of today’s training is to be able to apply the NHSC Guidelines for healthy foods and drinks supplied in school canteens to determine if foods and drinks can be sold in school canteens.

In this topic we will:

  • define what the NHSC food categorisation system is
  • briefly discuss the 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines
  • categorise food using the AGTHE, and
  • most importantly, use the NHSC Guidelines to determine what foods and drinks can be sold in a healthy school canteen.

The NHSC food categorisation system is a ‘traffic light spectrum’ (explained in more detail later) based on the Dietary Guidelines for Children and Adolescents and the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating.

The other poster displayed on this slide has been based on the AGHE and is specifically designed for Indigenous populations and includes pictures of some traditional foods.

Note: The Dietary Guidelines and the AGTHE currently are being reviewed and revised.

National Healthy School Canteens(NHSC) Project

The NHSC food categorisation system is a ‘traffic light spectrum’ (explained in more detail later) based on the Dietary Guidelines for Children and Adolescents and the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating.

The other poster displayed on this slide has been based on the AGHE and is specifically designed for Indigenous populations and includes pictures of some traditional foods.

Note: The Dietary Guidelines and the AGTHE currently are being reviewed and revised.

2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines

The 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines recommend eating a wide variety of foods including:
  • Vegetables, legumes, and fruits: they provide fibre, vitamins, minerals and carbohydrates.
  • Cereals etc: for energy in the form of carbohydrates as well as protein, folate, B group vitamins and iron. Choose wholegrain varieties for fibre.
  • Lean meat/fish/poultry/etc: for protein, iron, B12, niacin and zinc. Choose lean meat to avoid saturated fats and to decrease kilojoule value.
  • Milks etc: for protein, calcium, riboflavin and B12. Reduced-fat dairy products should be encouraged for children 2 years of age and over, to avoid saturated fats and decrease kilojoule value.
  • Water: an important nutrient - is kilojoule free and does not displace other nutrients.

The Dietary Guidelines also state that care should be taken to:
Limit saturated fat etc: as there is an association with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.
Moderate total fat: Why moderate not low? We need to eat fats, especially the unsaturated types. Low-fat diets are not suitable for infants.
Low salt: as previously mentioned, in those individuals who are sensitive, high salt consumption may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.
Sugar: provides 'empty' kilojoules, i.e. energy, but no minerals or vitamins.

The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating

The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating is the food selection guide for Australians. It provides practical information to help people choose a healthy diet from a variety of food groups. As well as information regarding food groups (briefly go through the food groups) it also provides recommended serve size and number of serves required to achieve daily recommended intakes of nutrients essential for health and well-being.

This information is also supplied in the NHSC Guidelines pp. 2-4.

Boys
4 – 8 years
9 – 11 years
12 – 13 years
14 – 18 years
Vegetables
4
5
5
5
Fruit
1
2
2
2
Grain (cereal)
4
5
6
7
Lean meats and alternatives
1
2
2
2
Dairy and alternatives
2
2
3
3
Girls
4 – 8 years
9 – 11 years
12 – 13 years
14 – 18 years
Vegetables
4
5
5
5
Fruit
1
2
2
2
Grain (cereal)
4
4
5
7
Lean meats and alternatives
1
2
2
2
Dairy and alternatives
1
3
3
3

Reference: Participant‘s Workbook p.11

This table on page 11 of your (participant’s) workbook is an indication of the number of serves children need according to their age to maintain growth and health.
Sample serve sizes are discussed on the next slide.

This information is also supplied in the NHSC Guidelines pp. 2-3.

This charts shows just one example of an eating pattern that would deliver a child’s recommended nutrient intake. Refer to the AGTHE booklet pages 20-21 for other examples.

How many serves would the following be? (Workbook, p.12)

Food GroupsServe Size
Vegetables – different types and colours, and legume/beans
    • cup cooked green or orange vegetables
      (eg broccoli, spinach, carrots or pumpkin)
    • cup cooked dried or canned , peas or lentils
    • 1 cup green leafy or raw salad vegetables, cup sweet corn, medium potato or other starchy vegetables (sweet potato, taro or cassava), 1 medium tomato
Fruit
    • 1 medium apple, banana, orange or pear
    • 2 small apricots, kiwi fruits or plums
    • 1 cup diced or canned fruit (no added sugar)
Grain (cereal) foods, mostly wholegrain and/or high in fibre
    • 1 slice bread, medium roll or flat bread,
    • cup cooked rice, pasta, noodles, barley, buckwheat, semolina, polenta, bulgur or quinoa
    • cup cooked porridge, 2/3 cup cereal flakes, cup muesli
    • 3 crispbreads, 1 crumpet, 1 small English muffin or scone
Lean meats and poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds, and legumes/beans
    • 65 g cooked lean red meats such as beef, lamb, veal, pork, goat or kangaroo (about 90-100 g raw)
    • 80 g cooked lean poultry such as chicken or turkey (100 g raw)
    • 100 g cooked fish fillet (about 115g raw) or one small can of fish
    • 2 large eggs (120 g), 1 cup (150 g) cooked or canned
      legumes/beans such as lentils, chick peas or split peas
    • 30 g nuts*, seeds, peanut* or almond butter *or tahini or
      other nut or seed paste
Milk, yoghurt, cheese and/or their alternatives, mostly reduced fat
    • 1 cup (250ml) milk, cup (120 ml) evaporated milk, 2 slices (40 g) hard cheese, such as cheddar
    • cup (120 g) ricotta cheese
    • cup (200 g) yoghurt
    • 1 cup (250ml) soy, rice or other cereal drink with at least 100mg of added calcium per 100ml

* Check your school policy regarding the use of nuts and products containing nuts

Reference: Participant‘s Workbook p.12

This table gives some examples of what is meant by 'a serve' in each food group. For more details check the table on page 12 in your (participant’s) workbook.

Food Group and Number of Serves – More examples
1. Breads and Cereals
1 1/3 cup cereal flakes, cup muesli, 1 cup porridge, 2 slices bread, 1 medium bread roll, 1 cup cooked pasta, rice or noodles

2. Vegetables and legumes
1 medium potato, medium sweet potato, 1 cup salad vegetables, cup cooked dried beans, peas, lentils, cup cooked vegetables

3. Fruit
1 medium piece (apple, orange, banana, pear), 2 pieces smaller fruit (apricots, plums, kiwifruit), 20 grapes, punnet strawberries, 1 tablespoons sultanas, 4 dried apricots, cup juice

4. Dairy
250mL milk, cup evaporated milk, 40g (2 slices cheese), 250mL custard, 200g tub yoghurt, 1 cup calcium-fortified soy drink, cup pink salmon with bones (bones need to be eaten)

5. Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, nuts, legumes
65-100g cooked meat/chicken (1/2 cup lean mince, 2 slices roast meat), 80-120g cooked fish, 2 small eggs, cup cooked dried beans, lentils, chickpeas, split peas or canned beans, 1/3 cup peanuts/almonds*. cup sunflower seeds or sesame seeds*

This information is also supplied in the NHSC Guidelines pp. 2-3.

How many serves would the following be?
(Workbook, p.12)
2 apricots -
1cup of milk -
1 beef sandwich with: -
2 slices of bread -
1 slice of beef -
3 slices of tomato -
1/4 cup of cucumber and lettuce -
2 teaspoons of margarine -
Total -

* Check your school policy regarding the use of nuts and products containing nuts