Australia’s notifiable disease status, 2012: Annual report of the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System: Part 7

The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System monitors the incidence of an agreed list of communicable diseases in Australia. This report analyses notifications during 2012.

Page last updated: 31 May 2015

Appendices

Appendix 1: December estimate of Australian population, 2012, by state or territory
  ACT NSW NT Qld SA Tas. Vic. WA Aus.
Source: ABS 3101.0 Table 4, Estimated Resident Population, State and Territories. Australian.
Males
186,598 3,624,791 123,542 2,278,280 820,358 255,419 2,785,448 1,227,524 11,304,018
Females
188,314 3,676,343 111,640 2,287,249 835,941 256,914 2,843,674 1,205,182 11,406,334
Total
374,912 7,301,134 235,182 4,565,529 1,656,299 512,333 5,629,122 2,432,706 22,710,352

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Appendix 2: December estimate of Australian population, 2012, by state or territory and age
Age group State or territory  Aus.
ACT NSW NT Qld SA Tas. Vic. WA
Source : ABS 3101.0 Australian Demographic Statistics Tables, Dec 2012
0–4
25,195 480,038 18,781 311,523 99,079 31,700 360,280 162,596 1,489,345
5–9
22,507 455,948 17,670 301,108 96,396 31,081 340,546 154,160 1,419,580
10–14
21,139 445,081 16,778 296,587 97,808 32,522 330,483 151,020 1,391,602
15–19
23,923 462,924 16,183 304,996 105,080 33,905 355,158 157,336 1,459,675
20–24
33,667 501,133 19,310 327,882 115,164 31,779 412,430 182,303 1,623,931
25–29
33,720 527,163 22,688 334,501 114,359 30,153 434,210 199,306 1,696,561
30–34
30,258 510,800 20,077 310,952 104,359 28,895 406,697 178,784 1,591,154
35–39
27,700 499,769 18,188 313,767 104,210 30,313 391,802 170,380 1,556,350
40–44
27,400 513,719 18,096 331,264 116,468 35,224 411,666 181,443 1,635,528
45–49
24,654 488,206 15,975 308,608 113,425 34,719 378,544 168,351 1,532,695
50–54
24,334 493,244 15,300 304,242 115,408 37,857 371,151 161,965 1,523,710
55–59
20,982 443,610 12,994 269,621 105,640 35,320 333,395 144,353 1,366,102
60–64
18,487 397,667 9,899 245,049 97,240 32,973 297,065 125,461 1,224,010
65–69
14,272 338,845 6,327 205,263 82,689 27,937 249,660 98,553 1,023,622
70–74
9,712 252,602 3,775 146,489 61,301 20,615 188,476 72,402 755,425
75–79
6,997 195,763 1,943 104,763 48,369 15,171 146,607 53,271 572,906
80–84
5,225 154,209 1,190 78,889 39,517 11,431 115,351 39,964 445,791
85+
5,011 146,462 707 72,701 39,523 10,511 109,000 36,346 420,267
Total
375,183 7,307,183 235,881 4,568,205 1,656,035 512,106 5,632,521 2,437,994 22,728,254

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Appendix 3: Indigenous status, National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, Australia, 2012, by notifiable disease*
Disease name Aboriginal but not TSI origin TSI but not Aboriginal origin Aboriginal and TSI origin Not Indigenous Not stated Blank/ missing Total % complete Number complete Number incomplete
* Infection with Shiga toxin/verotoxin producing Escherichia coli.

Indigenous status is usually obtained from medical notification and completeness varies by disease and by state and territory.

TSI Torres Strait Islander
Arbovirus infection (NEC)
0 0 0 4 5 0 9 44 4 5
Barmah Forest virus infection
27 3 3 579 811 299 1,722 36 612 1,110
Brucellosis
1 0 0 19 9 0 29 69 20 9
Campylobacteriosis
143 9 11 8,085 7,405 0 15,653 53 8,248 7,405
Chlamydial infection
5,760 685 347 34,762 22,673 18,480 82,707 50 41,554 41,153
Cholera
0 0 0 5 0 0 5 100 5 0
Cryptosporidiosis
171 10 8 1,487 1,242 225 3,143 53 1,676 1,467
Dengue virus infection
10 0 2 1,215 276 38 1,541 80 1,227 314
Donovanosis
0 0 0 1 0 0 1 100 1 0
Gonococcal infection
3,529 233 142 4,930 2,533 2,282 13,649 65 8,834 4,815
Haemolytic uraemic syndrome
0 0 0 19 0 1 20 95 19 1
Haemophilus influenzae type b
2 0 0 13 0 0 15 100 15 0
Hepatitis A
0 0 0 148 16 1 165 90 148 17
Hepatitis B (newly acquired)
17 0 2 146 25 3 193 85 165 28
Hepatitis B (unspecified)
154 20 7 2,342 1,902 2,084 6,509 39 2,523 3,986
Hepatitis C (newly acquired)
83 0 1 321 50 11 466 87 405 61
Hepatitis C (unspecified)
620 10 17 3,123 3,474 2,404 9,648 39 3,770 5,878
Hepatitis D
2 0 0 24 4 0 30 87 26 4
Hepatitis E
0 0 0 31 4 0 35 89 31 4
Influenza (laboratory confirmed)
1,258 38 50 19,060 17,221 6,936 44,563 46 20,406 24,157
Japanese encephalitis virus infection
0 0 0 1 0 0 1 100 1 0
Legionellosis
6 0 2 327 42 5 382 88 335 47
Leprosy
0 0 0 4 0 0 4 100 4 0
Leptospirosis
2 0 0 98 14 2 116 86 100 16
Listeriosis
1 1 0 87 3 1 93 96 89 4
Malaria
0 2 0 280 62 4 348 81 282 66
Measles
12 0 0 182 5 0 199 97 194 5
Meningococcal disease (invasive)
22 3 0 187 11 0 223 95 212 11
Mumps
1 0 0 119 49 31 200 60 120 80
Murray Valley encephalitis virus infection
0 0 0 1 0 0 1 100 1 0
Ornithosis
1 0 0 39 34 1 75 53 40 35
Pertussis
512 20 17 11,086 9,674 2,760 24,069 48 11,635 12,434
Pneumococcal disease (invasive)
230 5 9 1,320 143 115 1,822 86 1,564 258
Q fever
12 1 0 263 74 8 358 77 276 82
Ross River virus infection
78 5 1 2,230 1,965 404 4,683 49 2,314 2,369
Rubella
1 0 0 25 10 0 36 72 26 10
Rubella - congenital
0 0 0 1 0 0 1 100 1 0
Salmonellosis
350 12 9 5,849 2,824 2,221 11,265 55 6,220 5,045
Shigellosis
147 0 0 332 40 28 547 88 479 68
STEC, VTEC*
3 0 0 91 16 1 111 85 94 17
Syphilis < 2 years
153 1 4 1,226 146 9 1,539 90 1,384 155
Syphilis > 2 years or unspecified duration
162 16 6 842 322 6 1,354 76 1,026 328
Tetanus
0 0 0 6 1 0 7 86 6 1
Tuberculosis
28 3 0 1,276 6 2 1,315 99 1,307 8
Typhoid fever
0 0 0 113 6 4 123 92 113 10
Varicella zoster (chickenpox)
121 3 5 1,654 181 0 1,964 91 1,783 181
Varicella zoster (shingles)
115 3 6 3,823 534 0 4,481 88 3,947 534
Varicella zoster (unspecified)
121 18 13 2,142 6,159 0 8,453 27 2,294 6,159
Total
13,855 1,101 662 109,918 79,971 38,366 243,872 51 125,536 118,337

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Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank the following people for their contribution to this report.

Members of the National Surveillance Committee

The National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases

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Author details

Coordinating author: Rachael Corvisy

Data management: Mark Trungove

Bloodborne diseases: Amy Bright, Natasha Wood

Gastrointestinal diseases: Debra Gradie, Ben Polkinghorne

Quarantinable diseases: Katrina Knope

Sexually transmissible infections: Amy Bright, Natasha Wood

Vaccine preventable diseases: Kate Pennington, Bethany Morton, Rachel de Kluyver, Nicolee Martin

Vectorborne diseases: Katrina Knope

Zoonoses: Timothy Sloan-Gardner, Katrina Knope

Other bacterial infections: Cindy Toms, Kara Lengyel, Anna Glynn-Robinson

With contributions from:

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National organisations

Communicable Diseases Network Australia and subcommittees

Australian Childhood Immunisation Register

Australian Gonococcal Surveillance Programme

Australian Meningococcal Surveillance Programme

Australian Sentinel Practice Research Network

Australian Quarantine Inspection Service

The Kirby Institute for Infection and Immunity in Society

National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases

National Enteric Pathogens Surveillance Scheme

OzFoodNet Working Group

World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza

State and territory health departments

Communicable Diseases Control, ACT Health, Australian Capital Territory

Communicable Diseases Surveillance and Control Unit, NSW Ministry of Health, New South Wales

Centre for Disease Control, Northern Territory Department of Health and Community Services, Northern Territory

Communicable Diseases Branch, Queensland Health, Queensland

Communicable Disease Control, South Australian Department of Health, South Australia

Communicable Diseases Prevention Unit, Department of Health and Human Services, Tasmania

Health Protection Branch, Department of Health and Human Services, Victoria

Communicable Diseases Control Directorate, Department of Health, Western Australia

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Abbreviations

7vPCV 7 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

13vPCV 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

23vPPV 23 valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine

ABLV Australian bat lyssavirus

AFP acute flaccid paralysis

AGSP Australian Gonococcal Surveillance Programme

AIDS acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

AMSP Australian Meningococcal Surveillance Programme

ANCJDR Australian National Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Registry

BFV Barmah Forest virus

CDI Communicable Diseases Intelligence

CDNA Communicable Diseases Network Australia

CJD Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

CRS congenital rubella syndrome

DENV dengue virus

HA haemagglutinin

HI haemagglutination inhibition

Hib Haemophilus influenzae type b

HIV human immunodeficiency virus

HPAIH highly pathogenic avian influenza in humans

HUS haemolytic uraemic syndrome

ILI influenza-like illness

IMD invasive meningococcal disease

IPD invasive pneumococcal disease

JEV Japanese encephalitis virus

KUNV Kunjin virus

MMR measles-mumps-rubella

MVEV Murray Valley encephalitis virus

NAMAC National Arbovirus and Malaria Advisory Committee

NDP no data provided

NEC not elsewhere classified

NIP National Immunisation Program

NN not notifiable

NNDSS National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

NQFMP National Q Fever Management Program

NSC National Surveillance Committee

NS1 non-structural protein 1

RNA ribonucleic acid

RRV Ross River virus

SARS severe acute respiratory syndrome

STEC Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

STI(s) sexually transmissible infections(s)

TB tuberculosis

TSI Torres Strait Islander

VPD(s) vaccine preventable disease(s)

VTEC verotoxigenic Escherichia coli

VZV varicella zoster virus

WHO World Health Organization

WHOCC World Health Organization Collaborating Center

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